Skip to main content

BJJ Blog Post Feed

Starting Out - The Jiu Jitsu ocean

John Will's Personal Blog - Tue, 2016-04-05 23:48
When people begin their journey in the BJJ world, they often feel a sense of frustration and helplessness – it’s my guess that most of the ones who keep going are the ones who recognise that others are feeling the same way – and besides, they look around and see proof that others have acquired real and demonstrable skills and therefore it might only be a matter of time before they too will acquire these skills.

I have had a lot of students over the years, ask for advice and direction on how they should proceed in the formative years of their training … and although everyone develops slightly differently (there is no specific cookie-cutter approach), there is a way to look at it that makes sense and seems to help a little …

How do we start – the answer is easy: one position at a time. We choose a position that we think is attainable (it may be the guard, sider control, mount … whatever) and we focus on getting there from as many situations as we can. We focus first on getting there – and then we focus on being able to maintain that position. Once we can get there, and keep it – we begin to build attack skills from there.

A simple analogy I sometimes use is to liken the start to being dropped onto a world that is entirely covered by water – you start treading water, learning to float until off on the horizon and island emerges. You make your way to the island – and once there, you are much, much better off – after a while, the island becomes familiar ground.

Eventually, other islands appear, some bigger than others, each offering unique opportunities. as we become more familiar with other islands, and we begin to develop the skill to get from one to the next, the world becomes a much more inhabitable place. Eventually, much of the water becomes replaced by familiar ground – although we may find ourselves in deep water from time to time, we are never that far from dry land.

BJJ is just like this – it takes time, it takes effort but eventually you mostly find yourself inhabiting familiar ground. So for those starting out on their BJJ journey – although you might be treading water right now – it won’t be long before you spot your very first island on the horizon. Everyone starts this way - you are not alone.

- JBW

Advice for White, Blue, Purple and Brown Belts

Aesopian - Tue, 2016-04-05 14:04

Here’s the complete series I wrote for Inverted Gear on how to make progress from white through to brown belt:

Here’s the short version of my advice for black belts on how to get to first stripe: Stay alive for 3 years.

The post Advice for White, Blue, Purple and Brown Belts appeared first on Aesopian BJJ.

Seeing the Invisible ...

John Will's Personal Blog - Mon, 2016-04-04 23:16
I have long since developed a habit of looking at what instructors are doing rather than just listening to what they were saying. This is for a number of reasons but one of the main ones is that more often than not, many of my instructors spoke little or no English. So I learned to look. But that’s not the interesting thing!
Here’s what I have come to notice over three decades of martial arts LEARNING:
Virtuoso’s (the people we often try to emulate) DO NOT start out being Virtuoso’s. They start out with basic skill-sets like everyone else. 
They come up with simple – non Virtuostic (is that even a word?) descriptions for how they do their thing – before they become the Virtuoso’s that we admire. Then they evolve, the improve, they reach their Virtuoso status – and then – AND THIS IS THE PROBLEM – they continue to describe how they do their thing with their OLD AND AND PERHAPS EVEN OUTDATED DESCRIPTION. Yikes! How inconsiderate of them.
It has been my observation, that very, very few people EVOLVE their description (their: ‘HOW TO’) of what they do at the same pace as their actual technique. In fact, if I listen to their INSTRUCTION – I see that it oftens bears little resemblance to what they are ACTUALLY doing. This can be frustrating for many people. 
One of the most skills we can acquire is to get better at unravelling what the Virtuoso’s do; pry it apart to gain understanding - and help others better understand it also.
it’s so great to see others - dare I say … ordinary people achieve above-ordinary skills. I derive immense joy from having people shift from ordinary and cursory practice – to extraordinary and insightful practice.

- JBW

BJJ Book: The Combat Codes

Julia Johansen - Mon, 2016-04-04 13:44

A review of The Combat Codes by Alexander Darwin,  published by Insight Forge Press in 2015, ISBN 978-1517765064. You can see this review at Amazon, and GoodReads. Rated 4 stars out of 5.

Click the link to get to Amazon

Click the link to get to Amazon

Murray Pearson is sick of buying broken kids from the slave Circles. He’s sick of training them to become skilled combatants, only to watch them break again. He’s sick of reporting his failures as a talent scout to men who don’t have the guts to stand in the Circles themselves.

Cego doesn’t understand why he’s fighting. He doesn’t understand the grueling training sessions he’s forced to endure every day. He doesn’t understand why they scream for blood when he steps into the Circle. The one thing Cego does understand is hand-to-hand combat. He was born to fight.

Cego is sent down an unlikely path at Murray’s side, paved with fierce competition at the world’s most prestigious combat school along with the answers to his own mysterious past.

Synopsis

This story is mostly fighting/combat set in a scifi universe. Older, retired fighter finds young hopeful in a fighting pit. Retired fighter recruits young fighter for a battle school. Young fighter is awesome. Retired fighter discovers why young fighter is awesome, rocks young fighter’s life with the truth.

The obvious parallel is to Ender’s Game – especially with a young boy going to a fight school, but more like if Ender had been sent to a Japanese judo school and learned to fight. It also had a bit of a Matrix type feel to it, especially with the hyper-realistic simulations.

The Fighting

There were many elements of jiu jitsu, judo, and grappling in this, with the school levels being white, blue, purple, brown, black, and red; the many “OSSS”s that characters uttered; the pieces of martial arts wisdom such as “You may need to give up position to gain position,” and the fighting jargon. The vocabulary in this book was highly specific. This makes the fight scenes very easy to follow if you know fighting terminology, and potentially confusing if you don’t.

Cego shrimped his hips out, circling his legs around Farmer’s knee and shooting his hand in for an underhook. Farmer allowed him to take the underhook, fishing his own overhook under Cego’s armpit and through to the other side of his neck, countering with the brabo choke. Cego felt the pressure on his neck and shrimped out the other way.

The Sci-Fi

This story was enhanced by it being set in a scifi universe, and the main plot point about why the main character is special required a universe with this type of science. Watching a fight and being able to see all the person’s biometrics displayed – being able to see heartrate, images of skeletons and muscles, oxygen saturation, and blood pressure – all things I could see them showing on a UFC fight were this technology available. Having a fight ring that influenced a fighter in various ways – confidence, speed, etc, simply by which element it was made of. Having physical simulations to help train students to be better fighters. All these elements greatly enhanced the fighting storyline. There was also a deeply embedded theme of “Light/Darkness” – purelights vs lacklights, the scifi swear word “darkin’,” and even some beings of light – spectrals.

Review

I most enjoyed the storyline, and the integration of scifi with fighting. I thought they both enhanced one another quite well. It was imaginative, and even though there were very familiar themes present in many scifi stories, it was unique. I thought the final 1/3 of the book was much more interesting than the first 1/3, and I thought the ending was both satisfying and interesting, and it made me want to go back and reread the first part of the book.

There were a few points I disliked. I honestly thought the boy was in his 20s, and it felt jarring to realize he was 13. The character was NOT written like a typical 13 year old – he was far too wise for his age, and missed a lot of the common faults that 13 year olds have. I also sometimes had trouble transitioning from one main character to the next, but this could be me reading at night when I was tired. Finally, I have zero idea why there were “spectrals” – beings of light – not a clue what purpose they served, why they were there, etc.

Disclosure and thanks

The author sent this book to me for the purpose of a review. I did not receive any compensation, nor did I promise a good review. I have no connection to the author other than sharing the same hobby, Jiu Jitsu. Thanks to the author for sending me a copy and entrusting me to give a thoughtful and frank review.

As of the publication date, this book is available on Amazon Kindle for only $2.99 (free with unlimited Kindle), and the physical copy is between $11 – $15.

BJJ: The dangers of “I’ll Do Jiu Jitsu When…”

Julia Johansen - Mon, 2016-04-04 09:17

I have been caught in a terrible trap. Stop me if you’ve heard this before:

  • I’ll do jiu jitsu when I’ve lost more weight.
  • I’ll do jiu jitsu once I’m in better shape.
  • I’ll do jiu jitsu after I move.

Ah those conditional clauses. I’ve found that they tend to be wonderfully convenient, best-intentions, excuses. They’re my mental blocks as to why I’m not doing jiu jitsu right now. They’re much better than this one: “Well, if I go to jiu jitsu on Monday, it’ll be hard to find a parking spot when I come home.” Unfortunately, that came out of my mouth last night. My husband said “Really?? THAT’S your reason to NOT do jiu jitsu? Parking?”

Perhaps Dr Horrible has our solutions. The world is a mess. He just wants to rule it.

My status quo right now = not doing jiu jitsu

The reality is, it’s easy to keep the status quo. It’s easy to continue what you’re doing. If you’re doing a lot of jiu jitsu, it’s easy to keep doing it. If you’re not doing it, it’s easy to keep not doing it. Right now: not doing jiu jitsu > doing jiu jitsu.

In 2016 I can count the number of times I’ve done jiu jitsu on one hand. I’m a rock that is not rolling. There is no momentum. A tiny bit of momentum will move me a little, but not get me rolling. What I need to do is build that momentum. The conditional clause that has been my great excuse to not do jiu jitsu: “I’ll start doing jiu jitsu after I move.” Husband and I are moving to Huntsville, Alabama this fall. That’s like another 6 months of not-doing-jiu-jitsu excuses right there!

Thankfully, I started visiting a welcoming little gym in Virginia Beach, VA. The black belt, Diego, has been actively encouraging me to come to his class. Here was our recent exchange:

I am full of all the excuses

I am full of all the excuses

I will not lie. There is part of my brain that is seeking permission to NOT do jiu jitsu. I throw out excuses like “difficult parking,” “being sore,” “it takes 45 minutes to get there,” “I can start after I move” because on some level I want the people close to me to say “I totally get it.” Unfortunately they all know me, and they see right through my bullshit and call me on it. Sigh. I went to BJJ on Saturday, now I need to keep that momentum, but I won’t lie – it’s hard right now.

Jiu Jiu’s Question: What’s your status quo right now? Active? Lazy? What lame excuses have you been relying on to not be healthy lately?

BJJ / Grappling tips: Yoga & Jiujitsu

The Part Time Grappler - Mon, 2016-04-04 04:25


Adding yoga to jiujitsu is a great idea. The functional understanding of your body that the poses and flows of yoga give you, not to mention the breath control and mental focus, will go a long way to help both prevent injury by strengthening your joints and muscles and raise your competitive performance. Just look at the examples of Eddie Bravo, Sebastian Brosche and any Gracie. 
The thing is, we already know this. 
So why aren't yoga studios full of aspiring jiujitsu practitioners? The reasons are many:
1. Lack of additional time2. Money3. Not really knowing where to start...etc
All these reasons are perfectly valid and if like to use this post to help you overcome some of them. 

Let me start by saying that I personally believe that the 3rd one is the most powerful reason why most of don't, or at least delayed, do yoga. 
After all, there's so much out yoga out there that it's hard to know where to start. Not to mention, yoga enthusiasts are, well, often overly enthusiastic about yoga (not that we're any better with our gi fetish, belt embroidery, magazines, camps, comps, books, DVDs, apps, leisurewear and what not). It's easy to feel a little overwhelmed and just say "yeah, I'll start yoga at some point!"
I did some research and here is some great advice I've found from experienced yoga teacher Karen Fabian: http://barebonesyoga.com/about/about-karen-fabian-founder/ which I think you will find relevant to us Part Time Grapplers:
Don't worry about type of yoga. 
Dont worry about not having 2-3 additional hours a week on top of your (jiujitsu) training. 
Karen explains that she gets a number of referrals from athletes (runners and cyclists) and bodybuilders frustrated by the lack of flexibility their primary sport is generating in their body. To counter that she recommends the following those of us who are already involved in another activity or sport:
"To build flexibility while continuing with aggressive weight lifting/running/cycling: 
a) At least 1 class per week focused on general stretching (heated or unheated power classes work well as the poses mimic functional movement and joints are worked along their regular range of motion) 
Here's a great example of such a routine designed by Leslie Fightmaster and performed by Gracie Barra professor Flávio Almeida 



b) an insertion before or after regular exercise of at least 5 poses that focus on hip extension, shoulder opening, lower back stretching and hamstring lengthening."
In a previous post I gave you exactly such a list of yoga poses:
http://parttimegrappler.blogspot.com/2015/08/bjj-grappling-mma-tips-recover-faster.html
Karen then goes on to address the question of "How to get started / make time for yoga?":
"If more than 1 class per week can be completed, even better but in the case of these kinds of students, exercise time is usually pretty extensive as it is.""Overall, practicing 3 times per week is ideal but remember: a little bit of yoga every day is better than a lot of yoga once or twice per week. If all you can do is 15 minutes per day, do that."As often as I can, I follow a free 10 minute programme for Healthy Backs from an App called Daily Yoga: http://www.dailyyoga.com/yoga-programs.html. I try to squeeze in 2-3 of those sessions a week, before getting ready for work in the mornings. I can't see myself getting up an hour early everyday to do yoga, but 10 minutes? Anybody can do that. "All the guidelines in the world won’t replace what you most likely already know."Namaste and such.--------------------------------------------------
ZHOO ZHITSU IS FOR EVERYONE!

Check for more resources on Amazon.com:

Leverage ...

John Will's Personal Blog - Mon, 2016-04-04 00:22
Many martial arts systems, BJJ in particular, are built on an understanding and application of the principles of leverage. What does this mean though?

For years I thought I could answer that question – but the more I knew, the more aware I became that I didn’t really know. So let me take you through a sped-up version of how I came to understand what I currently know about leverage …

Firstly, I knew the word. I could use the word ‘Leverage’ in a sentence that made sense. At this point, I had absolutely no idea of what it really mean’t. I had some vague picture in my head of a guy trying to move the earth with a giant lever – who knows what he was using as a fulcrum, or where he was standing at the time???

Then, at some point, I realised that leverage had to do with ‘levers’. Slowly, ever so slowly, it dawned on me that the art of applying leverage was about achieving a lot with a little, about moving a larger object with a smaller object through some arcane use of these things called levers.

After quite a long time (in BJJ practice) I began to understand that the levers we are using (in that art) are in actual fact – the bones. I began to understand that in trying to move an elbow, I was pulling or pushing on the end of a lever known as the ‘humerus’. I also began to realise that if we wanted to move a lever, we had to apply the force to the ‘end’ of it – and not the middle of it. Basic stuff I know – but still, I admit this took me a long time to truly understand.

Slowly I began to understand how to more effectively apply force to, and move, the levers that were the opponents ‘bones’ – on the mat. My Jiu Jitsu life became easier.

Now, if we get that leverage is ultimately about getting a maximal result from a minimal effort – then it becomes easier to look at the broader aspects of our lives ‘off the mat’ and seek out opportunities to apply leverage there – in our relationships, with our finances, in fly-fishing for trout, etc. Are we getting the best result for the effort we are putting in?

I hope so – because this is a natural application of one of the skills we learn on the mat – at work in the larger part of our life. Leverage …. so much more, than just a word.

- JBW

Talking About Coaching and Learning

Aesopian - Sun, 2016-04-03 15:38

Listen to me on Coaches Talk with Bruce Hoyer on BJJ Connect. We discuss how to be OK with “failing” while learning, avoiding our students developing learned helplessness, and how to break skills down into sub-skills.

Let me know if you enjoyed this and want to hear more like this.

The post Talking About Coaching and Learning appeared first on Aesopian BJJ.

Black Mice & Happy Accidents

John Will's Personal Blog - Sun, 2016-04-03 15:37
How do new techniques evolve? I see techniques evolving two different ways; firstly, they can be designed through the process of intellect; that is, we can deliberately build them, correcting and modifying as we go – or they can be stumbled upon and evolve through what I call the process of ‘happy accident’.To understand the happy accident concept – we need to understand how the evolutionary process works in nature. To explain this process (and perhaps highlight how quickly it can happen) I’ll use the example of how a mouse population might change/evolve from white to black in only a few short generations.This example goes like this: we have a population of light colored mice living happily on the grass covered plains – a local volcano erupts, and spills large areas of black lava rock over their habitat. Now, one out of every 1000 mice, by genetic ‘accident’, is born darker colored.This happens purely by accident, as a result of genetic mutation … but then what happens, why does the entire population of mice turn black over a few generations. The answer is provided by natural selection … in short, it goes like this: we have tens of thousands of light colored mice and a few dozen dark ones.Because the environment changed and the landscape was now darker in color due to the volcanic lava flows, the birds who eat the mice can more easily hunt the lighter colored mice; in short time, the light population is decimated, leaving the few darker mice to breed and eventually populate the landscape.The point of this story is to illustrate how a random accident can have a real and lasting effect on how things evolve. I believe the same sort of process is occurring on the mat all the time.Sometimes, by pure accident, we turn left instead of right, we pull instead of pushing and something positive happens. Provided this happens with enough frequency that we take notice of it, we may decide to repeat it – and suddenly, we develop new habits and new techniques.Sometimes, these happy accidents can have a very significant impact on how our game evolves … another reason to approach grappling practice (or anything else for that matter) with a playful mindset.The more we ‘play’, the more ‘happy accidents’ we are likely to have … - JBW

Report: Polaris Pro 3

Meerkatsu - Sun, 2016-04-03 02:00

The third instalment of the submission-only professional grappling tournament known as Polaris Pro took place last night at the Poole Lighthouse in the UK. On display were 5 main card matches and 8 preliminary matches. Heading the bill was the mouth watering prospect of a fight between two leg locking experts in Garry Tonon and Rousimar Palhares. Yours truly here managed to bag a press pass and took some photos.



For various reasons, I wasn't able to attend the live shows for Polaris 1 and 2. I did see them on ppv live and knowing how exciting the past two were, I was determined not to miss Polaris Pro 3. And it did not disappoint.

Preliminaries
The prelims were exciting for me because I have known most of the fighters for many years and it was great to see them in action. These fights were aired for free.





The results for the prelims were:
Alain Pozo x Micah Atkinson (NO GI) - Alain wins by heel hook
Vinicius de Castro x Greg Creel (GI) - draw
Keith McKenzie x Jeff Lawson (GI) -  McKenzie wins by RNC
Adam Adshead x Phil Harris (NO GI) - draw
Travis Newaza x Ben Dyson (NO GI) - Dyson wins by kimura

The prelims were not without drama and thrilling action. Probably the best fight of the night in my opinion was the bout between McKenzie and Lawson. It was a real back and forth exchange of sweeps, passes, turnovers and transitions. Keith secured the choke against Jeff moments before the buzzer rang to end time, you couldn't have got any closer.

Another talking point in the prelims was the match between Travis Newaza and Ben Dyson. The taller Travis dominating the match for large periods and seemingly about to finish a nasty looking toe hold had his momentum halted when Dyson banged his head against the advertising hoarding. The referee gave Dyson an injury time out and then re-set the fighters in the middle in roughly the same position. Dyson escaped the leg entanglement and proceeded to gain top position and execute a match winning kimura.

Main card
The main card featured some mouth watering prospects, the Polaris Pro team having done a amazing job matching up the very best in the world against one another.







In a somewhat cruel twist of luck, the submission only format this evening resulted in 100% no submissions for the main card. Eight fights and eight draws. But dismissing the lack of submissions would do an immense disservice to the thrilling action on display.

There was something to talk about in each and every match but perhaps the two highlights of the evening were in the matches between AJ Agazarm and Jake Shields and the finale between Rousimar Palhares and Garry Tonon. The former match included a number of heated exchanges, face slaps, alleged illegal attacks (eye pokes etc) and a foul mouthed war of words. It was certainly highly entertaining but perhaps a little too over the top.



In the headlining fight, there was no war of words or unpleasantness, in fact, given the reputation Palhares has had with his previous MMA fights, it was all highly respectful. What us spectators got to enjoy was an absolutely amazing grappling match featuring no-stop action. The much larger Palhares opening with his trademark attacks against Garry's ankles but Garry fending them off while also having to deal with being thrown into the air with suplex throws and other moments of air time! Tonon himself was clearly a big danger to his opponent, locking on a number of seemingly tight heel hooks and triangle chokes. Watching these two combatants was like watching a kind of muscled up fighting form of ballet.

Final thoughts
The submission only format has been around now for a number of years. It was devised to ensure that fighters seeking match winning submissions would mean less opportunity for boring, slower, less exciting matches that the point based system is thought to induce. Unfortunately, the format itself is no guarantee of achieving submissions. But, as Polaris Pro and other successful events have shown, it does lead to a lot of exciting action and drama on the mat. I look forward to the next instalment of Polaris Pro!



For more photos of the event, see my Flickr gallery: https://www.flickr.com/photos/meerkatsu/albums/72157664413072193
To view the live replay online, visit the Polaris Pro website.





.

The BJJ Black Belt ...

John Will's Personal Blog - Wed, 2016-03-30 18:44
I was once asked ‘what’s in a belt?’ – I flippantly answered ‘mostly cotton’. It is though, a question worth answering with a little more consideration, as it can represent so very much, or so very little depending on the school, style, mat culture, etc. So here is my take on what it means from my particular perspective.A Black Belt represents a certain level of excellence; a departure from mediocrity, if you like. In some ways it really only denotes a commitment to a longer and deeper journey – in other ways and for many people, it serves as a final goal-post; a marker of a journey done-and-dusted; a conclusion.In Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, the Black Belt is referred to as Professor. The term Professor (literally: one who professes) refers to someone who openly professes a deep knowledge of his or her given subject. I don’t mind such a definition, as it goes directly to the heart of the matter – and that is, a Professor (Black Belt) should know his or her subject matter.Knowing the subject matter, really understanding it – is the first step in being able to teach or instruct others. I doubt you could ever find a history professor who didn’t know the basic facts surrounding ‘the battle of Hastings’ or ‘the fall of the roman empire’, etc- and so we should apply the same set of standards (in my view) to the martial arts.A BJJ professor should have some basic knowledge of a wide range of subjects, positions, guard-styles, defenses/escapes, Armbars, Kimura’s, Omoplata’s, leg attacks, takedowns, etc; if he or she doesn’t, they fall below a long-established standard.A seventy year-old Black Belt might not have the physical dexterity, reflexes or fitness of a thirty year old, but he or she should most definitely make up for that deficit in terms of knowledge and understanding. And this again, goes to the heart of the matter – and that is ‘knowledge and understanding’.Knowing our subject matter, as Black Belts, is something that should never be compromised; and nor is there any excuse for that to be the case. We live in a world that is replete with information; travel is easier than ever before; there are more schools to train and learn at, than ever before; the available excuses for not knowing our subject matter are fewer and fewer than ever before.The primary task of a fledgling Black Belt is to know, deeply and fluently, his or her chosen subject matter. I call this process of learning and understanding ‘taking ownership’. A Professor (teacher) should ‘own’ their subject matter – and by this I mean they have moved through the process of ‘casual exposure’ to an idea, to ‘understanding’ it and then to finally ‘owning’ it.A Professor should have an opinion on almost every facet of his or her chosen field – but at the same time should be open to new and ever-evolving possibilities and ideas.I like the fact that the average journey from white belt to Black Belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu takes around a decade. That is just enough time, in my humble opinion, to get the ‘big picture’ of what is going on and to acquire enough understanding of the many facets of the art to be able make claim to ownership and some limited expertise.A solid Black Belt should be have a reasonable working knowledge of many areas, and not just those areas that appeal to them personally. Learning to teach is about acquiring the ability to help others make progress and develop skills and understanding and should not be limited to just good knowledge of those areas of the game that we prefer ourselves.A history professor may have a deep personal interest in say, the European Middle Ages – but would also have some reasonable knowledge (at least I hope this would be the case) of history in general. This is also an important part of what it means to be a Black Belt (again, in my opinion).Naturally, (perhaps sadly), there is a natural decline in standards as time goes on. Many, many instructors are motivated largely by financial rewards and as such might find themselves handing out ranks more quickly than they would if money was not involved. My friend David Meyer (USA BJJ Black Belt) calls this ‘Belt Inflation’ – meaning that as time goes on, you get less and less for your Black Belt (dollar) than once we did.In some ways, there are some benefits to Belt Inflation; if it keeps people training longer than they otherwise would, then it could be viewed as a good thing. At the end of the day, it is all very subjective; for myself, I shall still wake up each day and swim against the prevailing trends – I am all for ‘raising the bar’ – and building a better generation than the one that I myself emerged from. This, to me, is what real teaching is all about.JBW

About Me

The Jiu Jitsu Game - Thu, 2015-01-01 05:05
I began my BJJ training at Sleeping Storm, an academy that offered instruction in all kinds of martial arts that was local to my home outside London. I trained there for six months under Ricardo Da Silva (then a Purple Belt), but decided if I was going to pursue jiujitsu more seriously, I would need to find myself a full-time academy. As a result, I moved up to London to begin training at the Roger Gracie Academy in Ladbroke Grove and spent several months sleeping on the floor at a friend's house and training every day. After three months at Ladbroke Grove, I received my Blue Belt from Roger Gracie in April 2006.

For much of the next two years, I occupied himself by training at the academy and assisting with the Kids classes that were operating at the academy HQ, as well as helping with any odd jobs that presented themselves. The Kids classes unfortunately wound down after the instructor moved on from the academy, and so for a while I was back to just training and doing my best to improve. I received my Purple Belt from Roger Gracie in June 2008 after my second attempt at the World Championships at Blue Belt. Shortly after that, I took up a full-time position as a receptionist at the academy, which finally gave me access to an income that would allow me to take my already-active competition schedule to the next level.

In October 2009, I left my job and am now living at the Roger Gracie Academy in Ladbroke Grove whilst pursuing a career as a full-time Brazilian Jiu-jitsu instructor. Finally, at the beginning of February 2010, I received my Brown Belt from Roger Gracie after winning the European Championships for the second time.

I would like to think I am one of the most active competitors in the world, having won over 40 gold medals in my relatively short competition career and taken part in over 250 competitive grappling matches, winning a significant majority. I hold a number of titles, both national and international, and continue to compete on a local and world level on an almost-weekly basis.

My most notable achievement to date was winning the Abu Dhabi Pro European Qualifiers in Barcelona, where I defeated a Black Belt and a Brown Belt in back-to-back fights to take Gold and qualify for an all-expenses-paid trip to the World Professional Jiu-jitsu Cup in Abu Dhabi. Although I was knocked out of that competition by a world-class Brown Belt from the United States, it was still a tremendous opportunity to compete in the same division as greats of the sport such as Marcelo Garcia, Michael Langhi & Claudio Calasans, and one that I hope to repeat in the near future. I have also won both the CBJJ and CBJJE European titles in my weight, as well as capturing the CBJJE Purple Belt Absolute title and medalling at the Pan-American Gi and No-Gi Competitions. Whilst a World medal still eludes me, that is one thing that I am hoping to put right in the near future.

About Me

The Jiu Jitsu Game - Thu, 2015-01-01 05:05
I began my BJJ training at Sleeping Storm, an academy that offered instruction in all kinds of martial arts that was local to my home outside London. I trained there for six months under Ricardo Da Silva (then a Purple Belt), but decided if I was going to pursue jiujitsu more seriously, I would need to find myself a full-time academy. As a result, I moved up to London to begin training at the Roger Gracie Academy in Ladbroke Grove and spent several months sleeping on the floor at a friend's house and training every day. After three months at Ladbroke Grove, I received my Blue Belt from Roger Gracie in April 2006.

For much of the next two years, I occupied himself by training at the academy and assisting with the Kids classes that were operating at the academy HQ, as well as helping with any odd jobs that presented themselves. The Kids classes unfortunately wound down after the instructor moved on from the academy, and so for a while I was back to just training and doing my best to improve. I received my Purple Belt from Roger Gracie in June 2008 after my second attempt at the World Championships at Blue Belt. Shortly after that, I took up a full-time position as a receptionist at the academy, which finally gave me access to an income that would allow me to take my already-active competition schedule to the next level.

In October 2009, I left my job and am now living at the Roger Gracie Academy in Ladbroke Grove whilst pursuing a career as a full-time Brazilian Jiu-jitsu instructor. Finally, at the beginning of February 2010, I received my Brown Belt from Roger Gracie after winning the European Championships for the second time.

I would like to think I am one of the most active competitors in the world, having won over 40 gold medals in my relatively short competition career and taken part in over 250 competitive grappling matches, winning a significant majority. I hold a number of titles, both national and international, and continue to compete on a local and world level on an almost-weekly basis.

My most notable achievement to date was winning the Abu Dhabi Pro European Qualifiers in Barcelona, where I defeated a Black Belt and a Brown Belt in back-to-back fights to take Gold and qualify for an all-expenses-paid trip to the World Professional Jiu-jitsu Cup in Abu Dhabi. Although I was knocked out of that competition by a world-class Brown Belt from the United States, it was still a tremendous opportunity to compete in the same division as greats of the sport such as Marcelo Garcia, Michael Langhi & Claudio Calasans, and one that I hope to repeat in the near future. I have also won both the CBJJ and CBJJE European titles in my weight, as well as capturing the CBJJE Purple Belt Absolute title and medalling at the Pan-American Gi and No-Gi Competitions. Whilst a World medal still eludes me, that is one thing that I am hoping to put right in the near future.

Achievements

The Jiu Jitsu Game - Thu, 2015-01-01 05:04

Amateur MMA Record: 25 W (23 SUBs) - 0 L - 2 D (link)

Combat Sports Open Trials 2010 - Welterweight Champion
UK MMA League 2008-2009 - Overall Champion
UK MMA League 2008-2009 - Welterweight Champion


Grappling Record: 272 W (176 SUBs) - 138 L (29 SUBs) - 2 D (15/10/12)


Grappling Competition Results:

2012

BLACK BELT


No-Gi Pan Championships - 3rd Place (Lightweight Black Belt)
Atlanta International Open - 2nd Place (Lightweight Black Belt)
American Nationals No-Gi - 2nd Place (Middleweight Black Belt)
American Nationals - 3rd Place (Middleweight Black Belt)
Montreal International Open - 1st Place (Absolute Black Belt)
Montreal International Open - 1st Place (Middle Heavyweight Black Belt)
Boston International Open - 3rd Place (Middle Heavyweight Black Belt)
Chicago Summer International Open - 3rd Place (Middleweight Black Belt)
Las Vegas International Open - 2nd Place (Middleweight Black Belt)
Toronto International Open - 1st Place (Absolute Black Belt)
Toronto International Open - 2nd Place (Middle Heavyweight Black Belt)



2011

BROWN BELT
English Open - 2nd Place (Middle Heavyweight Brown Belt)
Abu Dhabi Pro European Trials - 1st Place (Heavyweight Brown Belt)
London International Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
London International Open - 3rd Place (Middle Heavyweight Brown Belt)
Ground Control UK Invitational - 2nd Place (Brown/Black Belt Superfight)
Ground Control UK Invitational - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown/Black Belt)
Brazilian Jiujitsu Pro Cup - 2nd Place (Lightweight Absolute Brown Belt)
Brazilian Jiujitsu Pro Cup - 3rd Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
British Open - 3rd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
British Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
Welsh Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
Ground Control: Choke In The Big Smoke - 2nd Place (Lightweight Advanced)
UK Premier Championships - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown Belt))
Abu Dhabi Pro European Trials - 3rd Place (Lightweight Brown & Black Belt)


2010

NAGA European Championships - 3rd Place (Middleweight Brown Belt)
Milano Challenge - 1st Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
Milano Challenge - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
CBJJE European Championships - 3rd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
CBJJE European Championships - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
Ground Control Nationals - 1st Place (Brown Belt Superfight)
Midlands Open - 1st Place (Middleweight Brown Belt)
English Open - 1st Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
English Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
North West Open - 1st Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
JJI European Championships - 4th Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
JJI European Championships - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
Brighton Open - 1st Place (Absolute Purple & Brown Belt)
Ground Control 'Beat the Heat' - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
German BJJ Groundfighting Open - 2nd Place (Middleweight Brown Belt)
Hereford Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
Manchester Open - 1st place (Middleweight Brown Belt)
Gracie Invitational - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
Mediterranean Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown and Black Belt)
Copa Espana - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
British Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
British Open - 2nd Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
Abu Dhabi Pro European Trials - 3rd Place (Lightweight Purple, Brown and Black Belt)
London Open - 1st Place (Middleweight Brown Belt)
UK Premier Championships - 3rd Place (Lightweight Brown and Black Belt)
Disneyland European Open - 2nd Place (Lightweight Brown and Black Belt)
Disneyland European Open - 3rd Place (Absolute Brown and Black Belt)

PURPLE BELT

European Championships (CBJJ) - 2nd Place (Lightweight Purple Belt National Teams)
European Championships (CBJJ) - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Scottish Open - 3rd Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Scottish Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)


2009

Ground Control UK Nationals - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Abu Dhabi Pro European Trials - 2nd Place (Lightweight Purple, Brown and Black Belt)
Kent Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
No-Gi British Open - 4th Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
No-Gi British Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Ground Control 6.0 - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Pan Jiu-jitsu No-Gi Championships - 3rd Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Pan Jiu-jitsu No-Gi Championships - 2nd Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
European Championships (CBJJE) - 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
European Championships (CBJJE) - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Bristol Open - 3rd Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Bristol Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Grapplers Showdown Gi Challenge - 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Grapplers Showdown Gi Challenge - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Brighton Grab & Pull - 3rd Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Brighton Grab & Pull - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Ground Control 5.0 - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Ground Control 5.0 - 1st Place (Superfight Division)
British Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Celtic Open - 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Brighton Grab & Pull - 3rd Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Brighton Grab & Pull - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Pan Jiu-jitsu Championships - 3rd Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Welsh Open - 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Welsh Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Abu Dhabi Pro European Trials - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple, Brown and Black Belt)
Bristol Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Ground Control 3.0 - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
European Championships (CBJJ) - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)


2008

Copa Catalunya - 1st Place (Middleweight Purple Belt)
International French Open - 3rd Place (Lightweight Purple and Brown Belt)
Kent Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Open - Joint 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Kent Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Open - 2nd Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
NJJC National Championships - 1st Place (Lightweight Open Experience)
Combat Academy No-Gi Groundfighting - 1st Place (Ultra-Heavyweight Open Experience)
Combat Academy No-Gi Groundfighting - 3rd Place (Absolute Open Experience)
FILA British Grappling Trials - 3rd Place (Lightweight Advanced)
VT Jiu Jitsu Grappling Competition - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Brighton Grab and Pull - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Bristol Open 2008 - 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Bristol Open 2008 - 4th Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
ADCC UK Trials - 3rd Place (Absolute Advanced)
ADCC UK Trials - Joint 3rd Place (Lightweight Advanced)


BLUE BELT

Combat Academy Gi Groundfighting - 1st Place (Absolute)
Combat Academy Gi Groundfighting - 1st Place (Middleweight)
Gracie Invitational 2008 - 1st Place (Battle of the Brands Teams)
Gracie Invitational 2008 - Joint 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
Grapplers Showdown 2008 - 4th Place (Middleweight Novice)
Bristol Open 2008 - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)


2007

Northern Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
Copa Bitteti- 3rd Place (Lightweight Absolute Blue Belt)
Copa Bitteti - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
British Open Amateur Submission Grappling Championships - 3rd Place (Absolute)
Southern Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Blue Belt)
Southern Open - 3rd Place (Featherweight Blue Belt)
Bristol Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
FILA British National Trials - Joint 1st Place (Lightweight)
ADCC UK - 1st Place (Absolute Novice)
ADCC UK - 2nd Place (Lightweight Novice)
Essex Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
Irish Nationals - Joint 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Gracie Invitational - Joint 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
Gracie Invitational - Joint 1st Place (Heavyweight Blue Belt Teams)
Gracie Invitational - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt Teams)
Combat Academy Groundfighting - 3rd Place (Middleweight Open Experience)
III Coupe Suisse - 4th Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
III Coupe Suisse - 2nd Place (Absolute Blue Belt)
Urban Gorillaz Nationals - 1st Place (Lightweight Novice)
Urban Gorillaz Nationals - 3rd Place (Absolute Novice)
Amsterdam Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Bristol Open - Joint 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
Bristol Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Blue Belt)


2006

Northern Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
ADCC UK - 4th Place (Middleweight Novice)
Britsubfight - 2nd Place (Absolute Novice)


WHITE BELT

Urban Gorillaz SENI '06 - 3rd Place (Absolute Beginner)

Achievements

The Jiu Jitsu Game - Thu, 2015-01-01 05:04

Amateur MMA Record: 25 W (23 SUBs) - 0 L - 2 D (link)

Combat Sports Open Trials 2010 - Welterweight Champion
UK MMA League 2008-2009 - Overall Champion
UK MMA League 2008-2009 - Welterweight Champion


Grappling Record: 271 W (176 SUBs) - 126 L (24 SUBs) - 2 D (12/08/12)


Grappling Competition Results:

2012

BLACK BELT
Las Vegas International Open - 2nd Place (Middleweight Black Belt)
Toronto International Open - 1st Place (Absolute Black Belt)
Toronto International Open - 2nd Place (Middle Heavyweight Black Belt)



2011

BROWN BELT
English Open - 2nd Place (Middle Heavyweight Brown Belt)
Abu Dhabi Pro European Trials - 1st Place (Heavyweight Brown Belt)
London International Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
London International Open - 3rd Place (Middle Heavyweight Brown Belt)
Ground Control UK Invitational - 2nd Place (Brown/Black Belt Superfight)
Ground Control UK Invitational - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown/Black Belt)
Brazilian Jiujitsu Pro Cup - 2nd Place (Lightweight Absolute Brown Belt)
Brazilian Jiujitsu Pro Cup - 3rd Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
British Open - 3rd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
British Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
Welsh Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
Ground Control: Choke In The Big Smoke - 2nd Place (Lightweight Advanced)
UK Premier Championships - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown Belt))
Abu Dhabi Pro European Trials - 3rd Place (Lightweight Brown & Black Belt)


2010

NAGA European Championships - 3rd Place (Middleweight Brown Belt)
Milano Challenge - 1st Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
Milano Challenge - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
CBJJE European Championships - 3rd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
CBJJE European Championships - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
Ground Control Nationals - 1st Place (Brown Belt Superfight)
Midlands Open - 1st Place (Middleweight Brown Belt)
English Open - 1st Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
English Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
North West Open - 1st Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
JJI European Championships - 4th Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
JJI European Championships - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
Brighton Open - 1st Place (Absolute Purple & Brown Belt)
Ground Control 'Beat the Heat' - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
German BJJ Groundfighting Open - 2nd Place (Middleweight Brown Belt)
Hereford Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
Manchester Open - 1st place (Middleweight Brown Belt)
Gracie Invitational - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
Mediterranean Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown and Black Belt)
Copa Espana - 1st Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
British Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Brown Belt)
British Open - 2nd Place (Lightweight Brown Belt)
Abu Dhabi Pro European Trials - 3rd Place (Lightweight Purple, Brown and Black Belt)
London Open - 1st Place (Middleweight Brown Belt)
UK Premier Championships - 3rd Place (Lightweight Brown and Black Belt)
Disneyland European Open - 2nd Place (Lightweight Brown and Black Belt)
Disneyland European Open - 3rd Place (Absolute Brown and Black Belt)

PURPLE BELT

European Championships (CBJJ) - 2nd Place (Lightweight Purple Belt National Teams)
European Championships (CBJJ) - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Scottish Open - 3rd Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Scottish Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)


2009

Ground Control UK Nationals - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Abu Dhabi Pro European Trials - 2nd Place (Lightweight Purple, Brown and Black Belt)
Kent Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
No-Gi British Open - 4th Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
No-Gi British Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Ground Control 6.0 - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Pan Jiu-jitsu No-Gi Championships - 3rd Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Pan Jiu-jitsu No-Gi Championships - 2nd Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
European Championships (CBJJE) - 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
European Championships (CBJJE) - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Bristol Open - 3rd Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Bristol Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Grapplers Showdown Gi Challenge - 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Grapplers Showdown Gi Challenge - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Brighton Grab & Pull - 3rd Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Brighton Grab & Pull - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Ground Control 5.0 - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Ground Control 5.0 - 1st Place (Superfight Division)
British Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Celtic Open - 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Brighton Grab & Pull - 3rd Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Brighton Grab & Pull - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Pan Jiu-jitsu Championships - 3rd Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Welsh Open - 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Welsh Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Abu Dhabi Pro European Trials - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple, Brown and Black Belt)
Bristol Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Ground Control 3.0 - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
European Championships (CBJJ) - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)


2008

Copa Catalunya - 1st Place (Middleweight Purple Belt)
International French Open - 3rd Place (Lightweight Purple and Brown Belt)
Kent Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Open - Joint 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Kent Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Open - 2nd Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
NJJC National Championships - 1st Place (Lightweight Open Experience)
Combat Academy No-Gi Groundfighting - 1st Place (Ultra-Heavyweight Open Experience)
Combat Academy No-Gi Groundfighting - 3rd Place (Absolute Open Experience)
FILA British Grappling Trials - 3rd Place (Lightweight Advanced)
VT Jiu Jitsu Grappling Competition - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Brighton Grab and Pull - 1st Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
Bristol Open 2008 - 1st Place (Absolute Purple Belt)
Bristol Open 2008 - 4th Place (Lightweight Purple Belt)
ADCC UK Trials - 3rd Place (Absolute Advanced)
ADCC UK Trials - Joint 3rd Place (Lightweight Advanced)


BLUE BELT

Combat Academy Gi Groundfighting - 1st Place (Absolute)
Combat Academy Gi Groundfighting - 1st Place (Middleweight)
Gracie Invitational 2008 - 1st Place (Battle of the Brands Teams)
Gracie Invitational 2008 - Joint 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
Grapplers Showdown 2008 - 4th Place (Middleweight Novice)
Bristol Open 2008 - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)


2007

Northern Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
Copa Bitteti- 3rd Place (Lightweight Absolute Blue Belt)
Copa Bitteti - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
British Open Amateur Submission Grappling Championships - 3rd Place (Absolute)
Southern Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Blue Belt)
Southern Open - 3rd Place (Featherweight Blue Belt)
Bristol Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
FILA British National Trials - Joint 1st Place (Lightweight)
ADCC UK - 1st Place (Absolute Novice)
ADCC UK - 2nd Place (Lightweight Novice)
Essex Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
Irish Nationals - Joint 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Gracie Invitational - Joint 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
Gracie Invitational - Joint 1st Place (Heavyweight Blue Belt Teams)
Gracie Invitational - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt Teams)
Combat Academy Groundfighting - 3rd Place (Middleweight Open Experience)
III Coupe Suisse - 4th Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
III Coupe Suisse - 2nd Place (Absolute Blue Belt)
Urban Gorillaz Nationals - 1st Place (Lightweight Novice)
Urban Gorillaz Nationals - 3rd Place (Absolute Novice)
Amsterdam Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Advanced)
Bristol Open - Joint 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
Bristol Open - 2nd Place (Absolute Blue Belt)


2006

Northern Open - 1st Place (Lightweight Blue Belt)
ADCC UK - 4th Place (Middleweight Novice)
Britsubfight - 2nd Place (Absolute Novice)


WHITE BELT

Urban Gorillaz SENI '06 - 3rd Place (Absolute Beginner)

Sponsors

The Jiu Jitsu Game - Thu, 2015-01-01 05:03
 

Scramble

Scramble is what happens in MMA, jiu jitsu, and grappling, when two fighters are halfway between positions. It's the moment when everything is at stake, and it's a chance for either fighter to come out on top.

It's about whoever has the strongest will.

Scramble is here to rescue you from flying skulls, winged skulls, flying winged skulls with top hats on, minotaurs, bulging muscle man, dragons with flying skulls and top hats on them, flying minotaurs with winged skulls and flames, and all the other crap that infests the visual side of the MMA world.

I lived for many years in Japan, where I was exposed to some of the coolest designs I've ever seen. They were bright, bold, fresh, and sophisticated in their simplicity. Barely a rippling muscle or a pumped-up minotaur-dragon in sight.

T-shirts are emblazoned with barely-English slogans and large, bright characters. At first, I laughed at this English. Wanted to correct it. But now, I realise. It has taken on a life of its own. In the same way that a single, deft brush stroke can inspire the image of a swaying tree or a rippling lake in your mind, so a slightly off Engrish slogan can stir up thoughts and capture an idea better than a perfect sentence can.

Scramble is here to bring that to you.

Scramble t-shirts are made using high quality materials and printing processes, nothing like the usual printed-on-a-piece-of-tissue-paper stuff that you often get from small t-shirt companies. You might pay a bit more, but you get a shirt that looks and feels good, and will last a long time. We're martial artists; we need a shirt that can stand up to a stiff breeze.

A t-shirt is one of the quickest ways to tell someone about yourself. In a single glance, you can tell the world what team you support, what band you like, what film inspires you, or which athlete you cheer for. Probably not all at the same time, though.

And with Scramble, you can be sure, you'll know what the Japanese characters mean on your shirt.

Scramble also brings you select products from Japan (like BJJ Spirits, the awesome DVD magazine, and some special edition t-shirts from the heart of Tokyo), depending on the time of year and what's of interest at the time.

Scramble is a small company and values every single one of its customers. That means you.

Welcome to the family.

Scramble was started by Matt Benyon, who blogs at The Grappling Dummy

Roger Gracie Academy

The Roger Gracie Academy and its numerous affiliates make up one of the largest Brazilian Jiujitsu teams in the UK, as well as being home to many of the top competitors in the country. Leaving aside Roger Gracie himself (generally acknowledged as the number one grappler in the world today), there are numerous champions at regional, national and international level who call RGA their home.

Sponsors

The Jiu Jitsu Game - Thu, 2015-01-01 05:03
 

Scramble

Scramble is what happens in MMA, jiu jitsu, and grappling, when two fighters are halfway between positions. It's the moment when everything is at stake, and it's a chance for either fighter to come out on top.

It's about whoever has the strongest will.

Scramble is here to rescue you from flying skulls, winged skulls, flying winged skulls with top hats on, minotaurs, bulging muscle man, dragons with flying skulls and top hats on them, flying minotaurs with winged skulls and flames, and all the other crap that infests the visual side of the MMA world.

I lived for many years in Japan, where I was exposed to some of the coolest designs I've ever seen. They were bright, bold, fresh, and sophisticated in their simplicity. Barely a rippling muscle or a pumped-up minotaur-dragon in sight.

T-shirts are emblazoned with barely-English slogans and large, bright characters. At first, I laughed at this English. Wanted to correct it. But now, I realise. It has taken on a life of its own. In the same way that a single, deft brush stroke can inspire the image of a swaying tree or a rippling lake in your mind, so a slightly off Engrish slogan can stir up thoughts and capture an idea better than a perfect sentence can.

Scramble is here to bring that to you.

Scramble t-shirts are made using high quality materials and printing processes, nothing like the usual printed-on-a-piece-of-tissue-paper stuff that you often get from small t-shirt companies. You might pay a bit more, but you get a shirt that looks and feels good, and will last a long time. We're martial artists; we need a shirt that can stand up to a stiff breeze.

A t-shirt is one of the quickest ways to tell someone about yourself. In a single glance, you can tell the world what team you support, what band you like, what film inspires you, or which athlete you cheer for. Probably not all at the same time, though.

And with Scramble, you can be sure, you'll know what the Japanese characters mean on your shirt.

Scramble also brings you select products from Japan (like BJJ Spirits, the awesome DVD magazine, and some special edition t-shirts from the heart of Tokyo), depending on the time of year and what's of interest at the time.

Scramble is a small company and values every single one of its customers. That means you.

Welcome to the family.

Scramble was started by Matt Benyon, who blogs at The Grappling Dummy

Roger Gracie Academy

The Roger Gracie Academy and its numerous affiliates make up one of the largest Brazilian Jiujitsu teams in the UK, as well as being home to many of the top competitors in the country. Leaving aside Roger Gracie himself (generally acknowledged as the number one grappler in the world today), there are numerous champions at regional, national and international level who call RGA their home.

Contact

The Jiu Jitsu Game - Thu, 2015-01-01 05:01

Email me:

Syndicate content